The Visitor from the Gloria Scott – Episode 2 – Return to Donnithorpe


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Below we present the complete text of ‘Return to Donnithorpe’; episode 2 of The Visitor from the Gloria Scott.

Gaslamp Mystery - GM001 - The Visitor from the Gloria Scott

Gaslamp Mystery – GM001 – The Visitor from the Gloria Scott

ACT 2

INTRODUCTION (ELDER HOLMES, MARTHA)

  1. MUSIC: OPENING THEME – LET IT FINISH.
  2. NARRATOR: In our last episode the young Sherlock Holmes had encountered some strange goings on at his friend’s estate of Donnithorpe while on holiday.  His friend’s father had taken offense at Holmes’ attempt to investigate the matter.  As a result Sherlock returned, more or less content, to London… until a letter arrived.
  3. ELDER HOLMES: [CUE] The letter was addressed by a woman’s hand but was neither scented nor on expensive paper. The postmark indicated it was from the general vicinity of Donnithorpe.
    It read…
  4. MARTHA: “Dear Mr ’olmes,
    Please come at once. The dogs are all dead and the cabbages ’ave been blighted. Mr Trevor Senior is supposed to ’ave engaged a new man-servant, but no one, not even ’is son, seems to have laid eyes on ’im for some weeks. I’m sure you understand what this means.
    Your ’umble servant,
    Martha ’udson.”
  5. ELDER HOLMES: It’s true. I did know what her missive meant. Our nocturnal visitor of so many weeks before had made a home for itself at Donnithorpe and was growing stronger. The situation had, in fact, grown quite alarming in the intervening period and it was essential that I return as soon as possible. I telegrammed my intentions immediately and headed directly for the train station.

SCENE 6: EXT. CHISWELL COTTAGE ON THE NEIGHBORING HUDSON PROPERTY — MIDDAY (YOUNG HOLMES, MARTHA)

  1. SOUND: [57] (WALLA) COUNTRY NOISES (BIRDS, A FARM ANIMAL OR TWO) — ESTABLISH AND UNDER
  2. SOUND: [17] IMPATIENT LOUD KNOCKING ON THE DOOR — LET IT FINISH
  3. MARTHA: (FROM BEHIND THE DOOR) ’oo’s that knocking on my parlor door like that. It’s fit to knock the door clean off its ’inges.
  4. SOUND: [18] DOOR OPENS — LET IT FINISH
  5. MARTHA: Oh, it’s you Mr ’olmes. That was quick. You must’ve come up from London in a tearin’ ’urry.
  6. YOUNG HOLMES: Tell me about the dogs!
  7. MARTHA: And a fine how’d-ya-do to you too Mr ’olmes. Don’t they teach manners up in London no more?
  8. YOUNG HOLMES: Miss Hudson, we have very little time to lose. Please. Tell me about the dogs.
  9. MARTHA: Actually, we’ve a little time yet. The blight only reached our cabbages on Monday last, and ’ere it’s only Wednesday. The thing itself ’asn’t grown so strong as to take on shape just yet. (BEAT) Where’re you staying if I might be so bold?
  10. YOUNG HOLMES: (A LITTLE WRONG FOOTED) I suppose I shall try Donnithorpe, though I haven’t had time to communicate with Victor just yet.
  11. MARTHA: I doubt you’ll be finding any welcome there Mr ’olmes. Donnithorpe isn’t a terribly welcoming or ’ospitable locale at present.
    (BUSINESS LIKE) I think it’d be best if you stayed ’ere. We’ve a spare room at the back of the cottage and Irene’ll kip in with me.
  12. YOUNG HOLMES: Aren’t you concerned about creating a scandal?
  13. MARTHA: Mr ’olmes, I can take care o’ meself. I’ve been looking after Irene since my old da’ passed on and workin’ this cottage without much fear of the neighbors’ gossip.
  14. YOUNG HOLMES: Irene is your sister, of course. Not here at the moment though?
  15. MARTHA: (COLDLY) No. She’s out.
  16. YOUNG HOLMES: In fact, she’s not around very much at all, is she? I’d wager you do most of the work to keep the place running. Where is she right now?
  17. MARTHA: She’s over at the Adler farm. She’s found ’erself a nice young man there with “good prospects” as they say. ’e’s the youngest, but’ll ’ave a decent income nonetheless.
  18. YOUNG HOLMES: Yes, I’m sure. Spoiled her a bit after your father died, did you? And she let you, by the look.
  19. SOUND: [19] FACE BEING SLAPPED — HARD —LET IT FINISH
  20. MARTHA: (ANGRY) Mr ’olmes, life ’asn’t been easy ’ere at the cottage, and I’ve made my share of mistakes as far as Irene’s concerned… but I’ll ’ave you to understand that she is my concern… and none of yours… (THREATENING) Do we ’ave an understandin’?
  21. YOUNG HOLMES: Absolutely. (BEAT) And I accept by the way.
  22. MARTHA: You what?
  23. YOUNG HOLMES: Your hospitality, Miss Hudson. I accept it.
  24. MARTHA: (BEWILDERED) After what you just… You think I’m just going to let you…
  25. YOUNG HOLMES: Miss Hudson, if my capacity to so thoroughly insult both you and your sister hasn’t gone some way towards demonstrating that I am as safe and scandal free a house guest as you’re ever likely to get, I don’t know what will. And you might give some consideration to the notion that the demonstration of that fact also cost me a slapped face.
  26. MARTHA: (AMUSED) I see. (BUSINESS LIKE AGAIN) Well you’d best come in and I’ll be telling you about them dogs.
  27. MUSIC: [48] (BRIDGE) NEUTRAL SCENE ENDER — LET IT FINISH

SCENE 7: EXT. DONNITHORPE — NIGHT (MARTHA, YOUNG HOLMES, MR ADLER, IRENE, JOE, MICHAEL, PETER)

  1. SOUND: [1] WALLA — CRICKETS, WIND IN TREES, OCCASIONAL OWL HOOT — ESTABLISH AND UNDER
  2. MARTHA: This is trespassin’ you know. Donnithorpe is private property.
  3. YOUNG HOLMES: Really? I had no idea. We’d best be careful then, lest someone calls “the peelers.”
  4. MARTHA: Are you makin’ fun o’ the way I talk?
  5. YOUNG HOLMES: It never crossed my mind.
  6. SOUND: [20] TWANG-CRACK OF BRANCH — LET IT FINISH
  7. YOUNG HOLMES: (GRUNTS AS STRUCK BY BRANCH)
  8. MARTHA: Mind your ’ead, Mr ’olmes. Movin’ through the countryside at night takes a bit o’ care if’n yer not used to it.
  9. YOUNG HOLMES: You did that on purpose.
  10. MARTHA: (CHEERFULLY) Never crossed my mind.
    Anyways, that’s the ’ouse up ahead. We’d best be especially careful from this point.
  11. YOUNG HOLMES: How many dogs did you say have died recently?
  12. MARTHA: Near as I can tell, every dog in a ten mile radius o’ this place.
  13. YOUNG HOLMES: Yes, and I can see that the house is the source of the vegetation blight. Every blade of grass is withered around the place in an ever-growing circle.
  14. MARTHA: Can you feel it Mr ’olmes? It’s like someone’s got their ’and around my ’eart. Everthing feels cold an’ ’orrible.
  15. YOUNG HOLMES: Yes. Even the lights in the house appear muted and dull. This specter is unusually strong. I believe it will become physical soon. At which point the killing will begin in earnest.
  16. MARTHA: So ’oo do you think it’s feeding on. Young Mr Trevor or the old man?
  17. YOUNG HOLMES: Undoubtedly Mr Trevor senior. At least initially. I’d be very surprised if Victor hasn’t sickened as well in this unwholesome atmosphere.
    What of the neighbors? Are any besides yourselves suspicious of what’s been going on here?
  18. MARTHA: Ours is the closest property, so I don’t think anyone else’s been affected. The Adler’s are on t’other side, but the blight hasn’t spread so far yet.
  19. YOUNG HOLMES: And Irene? Can she keep a secret?
  20. MARTHA: Irene may be smarter than the two of us combined, Mr ’olmes. You don’t know ’er, but I do. She won’t be blabbin’ about this.
  21. YOUNG HOLMES: I may know her better than you think, Miss Hudson. From my examination of your living arrangements I am willing to own that she’s as clever as you say. However, she is also cunning and gives all the signs of being the kind of person who would sell their own mother if there was a profit to be made from it.
  22. MARTHA: (SHOCKED) Mr ’olmes!
  23. YOUNG HOLMES: I’m willing to own that you’re uncommonly clever yourself, Miss Hudson, but you do seem to have something of a blind spot when it comes to your younger sibling. What is it between the two of you that makes you so unwilling to look with clear eyes upon your domestic arrangements?
  24. MARTHA: (COLDLY) What’s between me an’ my sister’s between us, Mr ’olmes an’ I’ll thank ye to remember it.
  25. YOUNG HOLMES: As you say, Miss Hudson. Do you have the salt with you?
  26. MARTHA: O’ course. You don’t think I’d come out on a job like this without something I could use as a barrier against the specter. (BEAT) I’m ’oping you’ve not forgotten yours neither.
  27. YOUNG HOLMES: No, it’s here. I suggest you get ready to use it at short notice. I doubt we’ll get much more than a fleeting opportunity to try and trap the thing. (BEAT) Look, there’s something moving across the grounds.
  28. ELDER HOLMES: It was at this point that I saw the creature for the first time. There was something of an ethereal glow surrounding it but it was looking decidedly solid and well defined. The specter was very close to adopting a physical form and we were none the wiser as to the place where its bones lay. It appeared in the dress of a sailor, shabby, and damp. If we were not miles from the ocean I would have said that it gave the impression of one who had been drowned or at least choked. My curiosity was most definitely piqued.
  29. MARTHA: What’s it doing, Mr ’olmes? It appears to be carryin’ a box of sorts.
  30. YOUNG HOLMES: If my guess is correct, I’d say it is setting a trap.
  31. SOUND: [21] SHOVEL DIGGING IN DIRT — ESTABLISH AND UNDER — CONTINUE UNTIL 192
  32. MARTHA: It’s diggin’ an ’ole in the lawn. Is it buryin’ some’t?
  33. YOUNG HOLMES: Keep watching, Miss Hudson. All will be revealed.
  34. SOUND: [22] SHOVEL PATTING DOWN SOIL — LET IT FINISH
  35. MARTHA: It buried the box. I don’t understand.
  36. YOUNG HOLMES: It’s not over yet.
  37. BEDDOES: (CHANTS SOMETHING INDISTINCT)
  38. SOUND: [23] ROLLING THUNDERCLAP THEN SILENCE FOR TWO BEATS — FADE IN THE NIGHT WALLA ONCE MORE
  39. MARTHA: It’s going back up to the house. (BEAT) Mr ’olmes, what’s ’appening? That’s no ordinary specter.
  40. YOUNG HOLMES: No, it’s not. See, above the turned earth. That’s a corpse light starting to glow.
  41. MARTHA: A magical marker? A specter can’t create one of those.
  42. YOUNG HOLMES: No, it can’t.
  43. MARTHA: So, what? It’s not a specter?
  44. YOUNG HOLMES: Oh, it’s definitely a specter. The real question is how this is being done… and, more importantly, who’s doing it?
  45. MARTHA: ’oo?
  46. YOUNG HOLMES: Yes, who! That corpse light is the work of a sorcerer. And that specter? There’s little enough about it to suggest it could have spontaneously grown this strong in so short a time. A spectral haunting usually takes decades to develop. This thing is being helped. Donnithorpe and its surrounds have been targeted by a monster, true, but behind the monster stands one who is all too human, I’m afraid.
  47. SOUND: [24] STICK CRACKING AND MARCHING FEET — ESTABLISH AND UNDER — CONTINUE UNTIL 209
  48. MARTHA: What’s that?
  49. IRENE HUDSON: (AT A DISTANCE) Look to your courage, gentlemen. See the way the heath has been blasted. There is something unnatural in that house. And there, glowing upon the lawn, a marker of evil.
  50. MR ADLER (SNR): I see it, Miss Irene. Well enough to say I’m sorry I doubted ye. Joe, Michael. Dig it out. We’ll salt its bones and burn it away yet.
  51. JOE AND MICHAEL ADLER: Yes, Da’.
  52. SOUND: [25] GRUNTS AND DIGGING — ESTABLISH AND UNDER —CONTINUE UNTIL 230
  53. MR ADLER (SNR): (TO IRENE) As for you, my Peter’ll see you safely back to yer cottage.
  54. IRENE: But Mr Adler, I…
  55. MR ADLER (SNR): Now, Irene. You’ve done your part. This is a matter for the men folk and I’ll not be crossed in this by you.
  56. IRENE: (DEMURELY) Yes, sir.
  57. YOUNG HOLMES: Now why is it you haven’t learned to speak with such an educated accent, Miss Hudson?
  58. MARTHA: (SHOCKED) Irene? ’ow? But? I don’t understand…
  59. YOUNG HOLMES: Quiet. They’ll be passing right by us.
  60. MARTHA: But…
  61. YOUNG HOLMES: (WARNINGLY) They can’t be allowed to know we are here. Your sister will realize it as soon as she gets home anyway.
  62. IRENE: (COMING NEAR THEN MOVING AWAY) Peter, you are a dear! Thank you for speaking up to your father this evening. I doubt he would have paid me any mind otherwise.
  63. PETER ADLER: ’is bark is worse than ’is bite. Still ’is bark is pretty frightening ’n all.
  64. IRENE: (LAUGHING) True enough, darling. (SOBERING) I do hope they’ll be all right.
  65. PETER: It’ll take more than a specter to stop my old Da’.
  66. IRENE: Also true… I hope.
  67. SOUND: [26] FOOTSTEPS FADE INTO DISTANCE
  68. MARTHA: They’re gone. Now what?
  69. YOUNG HOLMES: Look back at the lawn. The others — Mr Adler Senior and his older sons I presume — are digging it up.
  70. MARTHA: They’ll not be finding bones to salt though.
  71. YOUNG HOLMES: Indeed.
  72. SOUND: [27] CRUNCH OF SHOVEL AGAINST A METAL BOX — LET IT FINISH
  73. MR ADLER (SNR): ’ere, that’s not the sound of bone bein’ struck.
  74. JOE: Aye, it’s not. ’tis a box. Pull it up.
  75. MR ADLER (SNR): Give it ’ere. What’s inside?
  76. SOUND: [28] HINGE CREAKING — LET IT FINISH
  77. MR ADLER (SNR): It looks like a journal, it does. Bring over that torch and let me get a better look.
  78. SOUND: [55] PAGES FLIPPING IN A JOURNAL — LET IT FINISH
  79. MR ADLER (SNR): (SLOWLY AS IF UNUSED TO READING) “I thought it was all past me…”
  80. MR TREVOR: (OVERLAPPING AS WE TRANSITION INTO THE PAST) I thought it was all past me. I changed my name to Trevor, made my fortune, and put my back to all the unpleasantness that had come before. A fresh start. That was all I wanted, but the true start of my journey was hardly fresh. (BEAT) There was a time, some twenty-five or so years past by my reckoning, that I sat in irons aboard the Gloria Scott. I had been fool enough to embezzle a small amount of money from my employer and, more foolishly, when my conscience would not let me rest, I confessed to the crime. The result was transport into penal servitude chained alongside as blood thirsty a group of miscreants as were ever gathered in one spot. Not all mind you. Some were poor young fools who, whether due to privation or stupidity, had been caught taking bread or engaged in some form of petty pilfering. But there were others, hard men and violent, for whom crime was their mother and hate the very atmosphere they breathed. And these had devised a plan.
  81. MUSIC: [49] (BRIDGE) HARP TRANSITION TO SHIP — LET IT FINISH

SCENE 8: INT. ABOARD THE GLORIA SCOTT — 25 YEARS EARLIER (BEDDOES, MR TREVOR)

  1. SOUND: [54] (WALLA) SHIP CREAKING, WAVES LAPPING ETC. — ESTABLISH AND UNDER
  2. BEDDOES: Alright lads, we’ve a plan and the Mate’s been bribed to hide weapons in the barrels on deck. The cook’s been bribed to put the keys to the irons in our hands at breakfast. After that it’s hold to your courage and take the ship.
  3. MR TREVOR: We’ll not be party to murder whatever else, Tom Beddoes.
  4. BEDDOES: (DISGUSTED) Oh aye. You want your freedom well enough but you and the other fancy gents who’ve been locked up with us cut-throats don’t want to sully yer soft ’ands with any o’ the real work. Well, from the looks o’ yer, ye’d faint at the first sight o’ blood anyway. But blood there’ll be. Mark my words.
  5. MR TREVOR: I guess it can’t be avoided. But the price of our silence is that it won’t be more than is necessary.
  6. BEDDOES: Aye, ye have my word. Not one more drop’n is necessary.
  7. MR TREVOR: (SUSPICIOUS) Hmmm.
  8. MUSIC: [48] (BRIDGE) NEUTRAL SCENE ENDER — LET IT FINISH

SCENE 9: EXT. ABOVE DECK ON THE GLORIA SCOTT — LATER (BEDDOES, MR TREVOR, CAPTAIN GREGORY, THE MATE, THE COOK)

  1. SOUND: [2] (WALLA) FADE IN SOUNDS OF FIGHTING AND DYING COMING TO A CLOSE — LET IT FINISH
  2. BEDDOES: We’ve done it lads. The ship is ours.
  3. CREW: Hurrah!
  4. BEDDOES: And now, Cap’n Gregory. Would you like to know who among yer crew betrayed ye? There’s no accountin’ for greed is there? It only took a few groats to get yer Cook to change sides. As fer our other conspirator, ye shouldn’ been so quick to ’ave yer Mate flogged now should ye?
  5. CAPTAIN GREGORY: Damn your eyes, Tom Beddoes, I’ll see you hang for this! As for you two betrayers, I’d cut your throats myself if I could reach you.
  6. BEDDOES: Cut their throats would you? Well, that seems as good a means o’ dealing with them as any.
  7. SOUND: [29] SLICING NOISE OF THROAT BEING CUT, BUBBLING GURGLING SOUND AND BODY DROP — LET IT FINISH
  8. SHIP’S MATE: You’ve killed the Cook! But ’e ’elped you! Why? UGH!
  9. SOUND: [30] SOUND OF KNIFE BEING WITHDRAWN FOLLOWED BY BODY DROP — LET IT FINISH
  10. BEDDOES: And now I’ve killed you too. See, a ship’s mate ’oo turns on his fellows fer money can’t be trusted I’m afraid. (CHUCKLES TO HIMSELF)
  11. MR TREVOR: (OUTRAGED!) Mr Beddoes! I protest. You gave me your word.
  12. BEDDOES: Aye, no more blood’n is necessary. And I says there’s more as is necessary yet, what with the gallows waitin’ if’n any witnesses survive. So, I says spillin’ every last drop is necessary… Ah, but don’t look so afeared Mr Trevor. You and yours ain’t for the knife. It’s bad luck to kill a fellow mutineer and you’re for the gallows with the rest of us if anything goes wrong.
  13. MR TREVOR: I won’t stand for it, Beddoes. You can’t be allowed to kill these men in cold blood.
  14. BEDDOES: Cold blood ye say? And do ye think transportation to penal servitude is any less an act o’ murder for all it takes longer? No, these men are dead already and I’ll brook no opposition on it. As for ye and t’other “gentlemen,” ye’ve a choice. Join us as part o’ the crew, killin’ an’ all, or we’ll put ye adrift in a long boat with some water. It’s as fair an offer as ye’re likely to get. What say ye?
  15. MR TREVOR: I’ll have none of it, Beddoes. Put us adrift.
  16. BEDDOES: As ye wish. But first we’ll be dealing with these “survivors.”
  17. SOUND: [31] SCREAMS AS CAPTAIN GREGORY AND THE REMAINING SAILORS ARE PUT TO DEATH — FADE OUT
  18. MR TREVOR: After the killing was over, we were set adrift and floated on the sea for a week before being collected by a merchantman. We claimed we had been shipwrecked on a whaler and the captain landed us in New Zealand. I didn’t learn of the storm, or the terrible goings on aboard the Gloria Scott after we were set adrift, until many years later: tales of cannibalism and the sinking of the ship in a storm, told by survivors at their trials, picked up in life boats. Beddoes was not among them so it was assumed he had drowned. As for myself, I made a fresh start. I made myself a small fortune in the goldfields of New Zealand under an assumed name and then returned to England where I bought Donnithorpe and settled down and had a family. The years passed and I thought it was all behind me… (BEAT) and then, five years ago, Beddoes appeared at my door.
  19. MUSIC: [49] (BRIDGE) HARP TRANSITION — LET IT FINISH

SCENE 10: INT. DONNITHORPE — DAY — FIVE YEARS AGO (MR TREVOR, BEDDOES, MR ADLER (SNR))

  1. SOUND: [58] (WALLA) TICKING WALL CLOCK — ESTABLISH AND UNDER
  2. SOUND: [18] DOOR OPENS. — LET IT FINISH
  3. BEDDOES: You’ve done well fer yerself “Mr Trevor.” Still puttin’ on gentlemanly airs I see.
  4. MR TREVOR: Good Lord! You! I thought you dead with the rest.
  5. BEDDOES: Oh no. I’m ’ard to kill I am. As ’ard to kill as you by the look. But not so fortunate.
  6. MR TREVOR: What do you want?
  7. BEDDOES: Ah, now don’t be like that. You’ve done well fer yerself “Mr Trevor” an’ I’m sure ye can spare a little o’ that good fortune fer a fellow mutineer.
  8. MR TREVOR: Then it’s money, is it?
  9. BEDDOES: It’s money and a roof over me ’ead. Life’s been ’ard these last twenty years, an’ you? You’ve been livin’ soft. Much softer’n you deserve. I reckon it’s about time I ’ad a share.
  10. MR TREVOR: I see. Well, there’s nothing to be done for it. Can I offer you a drink?
  11. BEDDOES: Oh, we are genteel, aren’t we? Don’t mind if I do.
  12. MR TREVOR: Here you are.
  13. BEDDOES: (BEAT) Mmm! A right drop, this. (BEAT) Not having one yerself?
  14. MR TREVOR: A little early in the day for me, I’m afraid.
  15. BEDDOES: (RESENTFUL) Or ye’re just too toffy to drink with the likes of me. (BEAT) (CHOKES A LITTLE) What the…?
  16. SOUND: [32] BEDDOES CHOKING TO DEATH — UNDER
  17. MR TREVOR: No, Mr Beddoes, it’s nothing like that. You see, it turns out I’m more like you than I thought. I’ve killed you, Mr Beddoes. The drink was poisoned. I’ve finally become what I’ve spent all these years denying about myself. I’m a murderer.
  18. BEDDOES: (GIVES A LAST CHOKING GASP AND DIES)
  19. MUSIC: [48] (BRIDGE) NEUTRAL SCENE ENDER — LET IT FINISH

SCENE 11: EXT. DONNITHORPE — STILL NIGHT (MR TREVOR, MR ADLER, JOE, MICHAEL, YOUNG HOLMES, MARTHA)

  1. SOUND: [1] WALLA — CRICKETS, WIND IN TREES, OCCASIONAL OWL HOOT — ESTABLISH AND UNDER
  2. MR TREVOR: I don’t regret it. Beddoes would have destroyed the life I’ve made for myself here. He would have ruined me and any prospects my son may have had. I threw his body down a dried-up well near the edge of the property, boarded up the opening, and tried to forget the blood on my hands.
  3. MR ADLER (SNR): (OVERLAPPING AS WE TRANSITION BACK TO THE PRESENT — ONCE MORE SPEAKING SLOWLY LIKE SOMEONE UNACCUSTOMED TO READING) “I threw his body down a dried-up well near the edge of the property, boarded up the opening, and tried to forget the blood on my hands.”
    Well, lads. That’s all the confession we needs.
  4. SOUND: [33] HIGH PITCHED RINGING TONE (UNDER) — INDICATIVE OF SOMETHING STRANGE HAPPENING — LET IT FINISH
  5. MR ADLER (SNR): (WORKING HIMSELF UP INTO A RAGE) It was Mr Trevor ’oo’s brought this upon us. It’s ’im ’as been blighting the land and turning the water bad. ’e’s brought the monster into our midst and ’e’s the one who ’as to pay.
  6. JOE AND MICHAEL: (ANGRY MUTTERINGS)
  7. YOUNG HOLMES: Something’s wrong here.
  8. MR ADLER (SNR): (SHOUTING, EXCITED) Grab your torches lads. Let’s put to the ’ouse. We’ll soon be rid o’ this demon.
  9. JOE AND MICHAEL: (CHEERING)
  10. MARTHA: They’re going to burn down the mansion.
  11. YOUNG HOLMES: This is wrong. The way they’re behaving. Something else is at work here.
  12. SOUND: [34] WINDOW SMASHING AND FLAMES TAKING HOLD — A CHEER GOES UP FROM THE MOB — LET IT FINISH
  13. MARTHA: Victor’s asleep inside as well. We have to do something or Mr Trevor and his son will both die.
  14. YOUNG HOLMES: Follow me. We’ll get around the back and see if we can’t get them out before it’s too late.
  15. MUSIC: CLOSING THEME AND CREDITS – LET IT FINISH.

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The Visitor from the Gloria Scott