radio writing


9 tips to Help Write Action Scenes in Audio Drama Scripts

Tips for Planning the Action I’m not particularly good at doing action scenes so a while back I did a bit of research and thinking in order to improve what I do. Here are some general principles for designing action scenes that I arrived at. They help me to be … Continue reading


How to Manage Pacing in Audio Drama Scripts

The Elements of Pacing Here’s some general advice I’ve pulled together from a variety of sources to help me manage the pacing in my scripts. Pacing is concerned with the way we control time in a narrative (both time as it passes in the story, but also the way we … Continue reading


Beginning – How to Begin a Script that Grips

The Elements of a Good Beginning How we begin matters. The beginning of the story needs to establish two essential things. Firstly, we must introduce our protagonist/s in terms of the life they experience as normal (I’ll explain that in a minute). Secondly, we must introduce an event that upsets … Continue reading


Learning from Erik Barnouw – Part 15 (and final)

Final Techniques Hi folks, I’m taking a final look this week at the advice offered by Erik Barnouw in his Handbook of Radio Writing (1947). This time the attention is focused on “simulating movement, manageing the climax, and closing” a radio drama. These techniques are common sense but nonetheless easy … Continue reading

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Learning from Erik Barnouw – Part 14

Scene Shifting (part 5) Hi folks, I’m taking another look this week at the advice offered by Erik Barnouw in his Handbook of Radio Writing (1947). This time the attention is focused on “shifting the scene” of a radio drama by combining the techniques discussed so far (or combination transition). … Continue reading


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Learning from Erik Barnau – Part 12

Hi folks, I’m taking another look this week at the advice offered by Erik Barnouw in his Handbook of Radio Writing (1947). This time the attention is focused on “shifting the scene” of a radio drama using a technique known as the “sound effect transition”. These techniques are common sense … Continue reading